Emotion Earns the Extra Mile

Emotion Earns the Extra Mile

For Father’s Day this year, my three boys joined forces and created a special homemade book filled with memories about what I meant to them. It was bound together with a little help from Mom, I presume. And they presented it to me while we were away on a family trip.

Well, I blew it. This homemade gift, filled with all the love and personal notes about what I meant to my children, got left in the front passenger-side door of our white, rental suburban.

Ten days later, I got a call from the rental car agency. The woman on the other line conveyed that she was absolutely not supposed to call me (it violated their policy on Lost and Found items, thus not naming the agency), but the folks who rented the car after me were adamant that I needed to get this book returned to me. She patiently listened to their plea, then she decided to take a look at the book. Having two kids, herself, she started tearing up as she read my book. In fact, the book made its way around the entire rental car agency office before she quietly picked up the phone, against all rules and odds, found me on social media and called my office.

Emotion impacted her willingness to go above and beyond. In fact, when emotion is involved, the chances that you will motivate someone to action increase so much that it’s silly not to try.

Now, nothing about me leaving that book in that rental suburban was intentional. But it does help illustrate a point. It’s a real story that happened to me, and it drove someone else to act on my behalf. Maybe it even made you feel something as you were reading it.

That’s the power of emotion. And that’s the power of story.

If you’re reading this on Wednesday morning, see what you can do on Wednesday afternoon to add a little bit more emotion to your communication. See if you can get someone around you – your team, your boss, your board, or even one of your clients – to do what you need them to do.

 

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